FLYING THE HUMP: MEMORIES OF AN AIR WAR. Otha C. SPENCER.
FLYING THE HUMP: MEMORIES OF AN AIR WAR
FLYING THE HUMP: MEMORIES OF AN AIR WAR

FLYING THE HUMP: MEMORIES OF AN AIR WAR

College Station: Texas A&M University Press, [1994]. Illustrated With Photographs. First (softcover) Edition, second printing. With a nice signed presentation from Spencer on the title page, to an Air Force Colonel who flew "The Hump": To: Col. Arthur Krause, The Hump was a great experience. I would have been lost many times without radar & LORAN-- Congrats on your 80th, Best wishes, Otha Spencer." Uncommon to find a signed copy! Col. Arthur Fox Krause flew as a navigator on various Air Force military airplanes during the World War II delivering planes to the many theaters of the war, including North Africa, Europe, the Pacific, and even flying "over the hump." Noted historian Theodore White called it "the most dangerous, terrifying, barbarous aerial transport run in the world . . . the skyway to Hell." This is the story of the air war over the Himalaya Mountains, during World War II, when Japan and China were locked in a death struggle. China was completely cut off from the world and the transport planes of the Allies flew day and night missions for more than three years over the Himalayas to keep China supplied with war materials. This was called “The Hump.” Gen. Claire Chennault's Flying Tigers crossed the Hump to outgun the Japanese Zeros in some of the most spectacular air battles of World War II. More than one thousand airmen and six hundred transport planes were lost, flying air routes that were so dangerous they were called the "aluminum trail." The B-29 Superfortress flew four-day missions across the Hump to bomb the Japanese mainland. With a touching presentation from Krause's niece, Judi, on the front endpaper. 8vo., pictorial wraps; 217 pages. Item #56623

Fine condition.

Price: $85.00

See all items in AVIATION, MILITARY, SIGNED
See all items by