AFTER SLAVERY: THE NEGRO IN SOUTH CAROLINA DURING RECONSTRUCTION, 1861-1877. Joel WILLIAMSON.
AFTER SLAVERY: THE NEGRO IN SOUTH CAROLINA DURING RECONSTRUCTION, 1861-1877.
AFTER SLAVERY: THE NEGRO IN SOUTH CAROLINA DURING RECONSTRUCTION, 1861-1877.

AFTER SLAVERY: THE NEGRO IN SOUTH CAROLINA DURING RECONSTRUCTION, 1861-1877.

Chapel Hill: The University Of North Carolina Press, [1965]. First Edition. Signed presentation from Williamson on the front endpaper: “To Stella and Luther Sharpe, with warm regards, Joel Williamson.” The first substantial contribution to a revision in Reconstruction history with significant new materials, mainly from manuscript sources. Stella Gentry Sharpe [1891-1978] is the author of “Tobe,” published by the University of North Carolina Press in 1939. Sharpe, a longtime teacher in the Hillsborough schools who lived with her husband [Luther May Sharpe 1891-1966] on a farm just north of Chapel Hill, wrote the book in response to a question from an African-American boy who lived near her. The boy, Clay McCauley Jr., wanted to know why there were no children’s books with boys that looked like him. Sharpe set out to prove McCauley wrong. The main character, Tobe, is a young African-American farm boy and his family. While the name Tobe was made up, other names in the book are those of McCauley’s siblings: Raeford, Rufus and twin boys Alvis and Alton. The photographs in the book were taken by Charles Farrell, the first professional photographer for the Greensboro Daily News. First Edition copies are uncommon, although there are later reprint editions. A wonderful association copy of a scarce book! Tall 8vo., blue cloth in dust jacket; 442 pages. Item #57412

Very Good (covers nice; contents clean & tight); little wear & soiling (few small chips) d/j.

Price: $250.00

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